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My Essentials: Chef Eric Ripert

My Essentials: Chef Eric Ripert


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Eric Ripert, chef and co-owner of internationally acclaimed Le Bernardin, is celebrated as one of the greatest chefs today. Drawing culinary influences from his upbringing, the French chef, author, and television personality — who has served as a guest judge on Top Chef alongside our latest cover star, Padma Lakshmi — specializes in French and seafood cuisine.

Born in Antibes, France, and later moving to Andorra, nestled between the French and Spanish borders, Ripert displayed an early passion for cooking after leaning from his grandmother. Later, he moved back to France at the age of 15 to enroll in culinary school in Perpignan. And the rest is history: Ripert has received countless accolades and continues to "place food at the center of humanity, as it nourishes not only our physical bodies but also our emotional lives."

We recently caught up with the busy chef to discuss all his essentials, from his favorite charities to work with, like City Harvest, to the daily snack he can’t live without. Read our exclusive interview below then scroll through the slideshow above to shop some of Eric Ripert’s favorite things.

Lifestyle Mirror: Favorite knife?
Eric Ripert: I have a vast selection of knives, mostly from Japan and Europe. My favorite knife is always the one I need at the time!

Lifestyle Mirror: Do you like to listen to music while cooking? If so, what?
Eric Ripert: I do listen to music at home while I cook, but not at work. I listen to everything except hard rock and punk.

Lifestyle Mirror: Favorite restaurant besides your own?
Eric Ripert: There are too many to list and to be fair!

Lifestyle Mirror: Signature drink?
Eric Ripert: Bordeaux, Scotch, and tequila, and not necessarily in that order!

Lifestyle Mirror: Favorite movie?
Eric Ripert: I don't like war movies, however The Wall and Apocalypse Now are two of my favorite movies.

Lifestyle Mirror: Favorite snack?
Eric Ripert: Dark chocolate. Every day.

Lifestyle Mirror: Who inspires you?
Eric Ripert: I am inspired by traveling and by my surroundings, but if I had to pick a person, His Holiness the Dalai Lama is of great inspiration to me.

Lifestyle Mirror: Favorite place in the world?
Eric Ripert: Wherever I am at any given moment (except for LGA!).

Lifestyle Mirror: Next vacation destination?
Eric Ripert: I see an Ibiza comeback happening soon!

Lifestyle Mirror: Charities you work with?
Eric Ripert: City Harvest, The Tibet Fund, and many others.

Lifestyle Mirror: Signature scent?
Eric Ripert: By the end of the day, pan-roasted fish...(laughs).

Lifestyle Mirror: What do you wear on-duty?
Eric Ripert: Chef jacket, jeans, and sneakers.

Lifestyle Mirror: Off-duty shoe brand?
Eric Ripert: Converse and Prada.

— Courtney Porkoláb, Lifestyle Mirror

More From Lifestyle Mirror:

• Best High Protein Foods

• 5 Recipes Under 400 Calories

• 10 Awesome Kale Recipes


Chef Eric Ripert gives Caesar salad a French twist: The gratin treatment

At his seafood restaurant Le Bernardin, chef Eric Ripert is renowned for treating the highest-quality fish simply but beautifully.

When it comes to the food he eats most frequently when he’s not at the restaurant – vegetables – he takes the same approach. “The idea is to elevate the qualities of every ingredient, to enhance them, to make them the best I can,” he said in a phone interview.

His newest book, “Vegetable Simple,” is a gorgeous ode to the philosophy. With stunning photographs by Nigel Parry, the book presents the possibly radical idea that with the same attention to detail that many cooks lavish on animal products, you can create vegetable dishes that sing, without using a lot of ingredients or necessarily even taking a lot of time.

The book also connects to Ripert’s Buddhism. When I interviewed him, I asked about his quote on the back cover, which ends with the idea that cooking delicious vegetables “is for the well-being of all.” He pointed me to the last line in his acknowledgments, in which he thanks Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard and his book “A Plea for the Animals” for planting the seed that led him to write “Vegetable Simple.”

Ripert said he was trying to pack a lot into a short phrase – the well-being of animals that suffer on factory farms, the well-being of humans eating healthy food and the well-being of the planet. “That last one ultimately has an impact on the human population,” he told me. “So, therefore, this is the secret motivation of this book. I didn’t want to make it a religious book or a political statement – I wanted to inspire people to cook. But since you discovered the hidden message, you have the answer.”

Back to the vegetables. A prime example of Ripert’s approach is the Caesar-salad gratin. You make a simple dressing, grate a lot – I mean a lot – of Parmesan cheese, then brush the dressing on the cut side of halved romaine hearts, sprinkle with the cheese and slip them under the broiler for a few minutes. The result is something that straddles the line between raw and cooked, hot and cold, and I found it nothing short of astonishing, in a why-didn’t-I-think-of-that kind of way, but also in a when-am-I-making-this-again kind of way. Ripert said he came up with it with friend and fellow chef Laurent Manrique one day when they craved Caesar salad but wanted something more.

“I think we were drinking a lot of wine,” he said.

I found only one thing to quibble with in Ripert’s recipe, and that was his assertion that the dish must be eaten as soon as possible after it comes out from under the broiler. Sure, it was stellar that way, but I had several halves left over, and for a couple of days I chopped it up and used it as the base of another salad, cold and with the cheese congealed. It wasn’t the same, but it was great, simply great.

This play on a Caesar salad keeps the freshness and crunch but adds a fun gratin effect thanks to a short spin under the broiler. It’s best eaten immediately, before the romaine wilts or gets soggy, but leftovers also work well as the base of a chopped salad or on a burger or other sandwich. If you’d like to make this vegan, replace the eggs and olive oil with 3/4 cup vegan mayo, whisking in the mustard, lemon juice and garlic, and use a vegan Parmesan such as Violife brand.

Storage Notes: The gratin is best eaten hot, but can be refrigerated for up to 5 days. The dressing can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.

To make this vegan: Replace the eggs and olive oil with 3/4 cup vegan mayo, whisking in the mustard, lemon juice and garlic, and use a vegan Parmesan such as Violife brand.

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste

4 jumbo romaine lettuce hearts

8 ounces (3 cups packed) finely grated Parmesan cheese

Freshly ground black pepper

In a blender or mini food processor, combine the egg yolks, garlic, mustard and lemon juice and puree at medium speed while slowly drizzling in the olive oil, until it is fully incorporated and the dressing resembles a pourable mayonnaise. Stir in the salt. Taste, and season with more salt, if needed.

Position a rack in the highest position in the oven and turn on the broiler.

Trim off the barest slice of the browned end of each romaine heart, making sure to keep the core intact. Halve each romaine heart lengthwise.

Lay out the romaine halves, cut side up, on a rimmed baking sheet large enough to hold them in a single layer. Brush each half with the dressing, making sure that it gets between the leaves. Sprinkle with the Parmesan. (It may seem like way too much cheese, especially if you grated the cheese with a Microplane so it’s incredibly fluffy, but it works.) Broil until the cheese is bubbling and golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Grind black pepper over the top and serve hot.

Nutrition (Based on 8 servings) | Calories: 279 Total Fat: 24 g Saturated Fat: 7 g Cholesterol: 71 mg Sodium: 628 mg Total Carbohydrates: 6 g Dietary Fiber: 2 g Sugar: 2 g Protein: 13 g

Adapted from “Vegetable Simple” by Eric Ripert (Random House, 2021).

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Preparation

Season cubed beef with salt and pepper, then sear in heavy bottom pan for 5-7 minutes. Remove and drain.

Reduce heat to medium. Add a small amount of oil, then onion, carrot, and garlic, and season lightly with salt and pepper. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Add paprika and caraway seeds, cook for an additional minute.

Add vinegar and reduce, then add tomato paste. Cook for 1 minute.

Add flour and cook for 1 minute, then add chicken stock. Bring to simmer.

Return the drained beef to pot. Cover and place in 350°F oven for 2 hours, occasionally stirring. If the liquid starts to evaporate, you can add up to one more cup of stock.

Remove from oven and taste to check seasoning, adjusting if necessary.

Finish with chopped marjoram and parsley. Serve with egg noodles. Optional: Garnish with sour cream or crème fraiche.


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My Essentials: Chef Eric Ripert - Recipes

Leave it to Chef Eric Ripert to turn purple cabbage from pauper to prince.

Yes, in the hands of this gifted Michelin three-starred chef, this lowly veg shines as royalty on the plate.

“Soy-Glazed Red Cabbage” is one of the star recipes in his newest cookbook, “Vegetable Simple” (Random House), of which I received a review copy.

As the long-time chef and co-owner of the venerable Le Bernardin in New York, Ripert has honed the magic touch with seafood. Now, he applies that same exquisite care to vegetables in recipes that are truly simple. In fact, most of them call for just a handful of ingredients along with three to six paragraphs of directions.

You will salivate without feeling the least bit intimidated when you come across recipes such as “End of Summer Tomato ‘Tea’,” Warm Potato, Goat Cheese Parfaits,” “Curried Brussels Sprouts,” and “Corn Cake, Blueberry Compote.”

Wedges of purple cabbage cook in a saute pan on the stove-top with a little water and butter, like making glazed carrots. OK, maybe more than a little butter more like half a stick. But hey, you can’t fault a Frenchman for that.

When the cabbage is tender, a splash of sherry vinegar goes into the pan. Then, the wedges are brushed with soy sauce.

What you get is brilliantly hued cabbage, all soft and melty with its natural sugars heightened. The butter turns it beautifully glossy looking while imparting a lush silkiness to the whole dish. And the soy sauce and vinegar layer on the merest touch of brininess and fruity zing.

From humble to fancy — in a flash.

Taking purple cabbage beyond the usual coleslaw.

Soy-Glazed Red Cabbage

4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter

1 red cabbage, cut through the core into 8 wedges

Fine sea salt and freshly ground white pepper

2 tablespoons aged sherry vinegar

In a large saute pan, bring 1/2 cup water and the butter to a simmer. Season each cabbage wedge with salt and white pepper and add to the pan, cover with foil, and cook for 20 minutes.

Flip the wedges over and cook until the water has evaporated and the cabbage is tender, about 15 minutes. Add the sherry vinegar, flipping the cabbage once more to coat. Cook until the vinegar is reduced by half.

Remove from the heat and, using a pastry brush, brush each wedge with soy sauce and let caramelize in the hot pan for 2 minutes. Serve immediately.

From “Vegetable Simple” by Eric Ripert

Another Eric Ripert Recipe to Enjoy: Sauteed Shiitake Mushrooms with Sage


Eric Ripert gives Caesar salad a French twist: The gratin treatment

At his seafood restaurant Le Bernardin, chef Eric Ripert is renowned for treating the highest-quality fish simply but beautifully.

When it comes to the food he eats most frequently when he’s not at the restaurant — vegetables — he takes the same approach. “The idea is to elevate the qualities of every ingredient, to enhance them, to make them the best I can,” he said in a phone interview.

His newest book, “Vegetable Simple,” is a gorgeous ode to the philosophy. With stunning photographs by Nigel Parry, the book presents the possibly radical idea that with the same attention to detail that many cooks lavish on animal products, you can create vegetable dishes that sing, without using a lot of ingredients or necessarily even taking a lot of time.

The book also connects to Ripert’s Buddhism. When I interviewed him, I asked about his quote on the back cover, which ends with the idea that cooking delicious vegetables “is for the well-being of all.” He pointed me to the last line in his acknowledgments, in which he thanks Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard and his book “A Plea for the Animals” for planting the seed that led him to write “Vegetable Simple.”

Ripert said he was trying to pack a lot into a short phrase — the well-being of animals that suffer on factory farms, the well-being of humans eating healthy food and the well-being of the planet. “That last one ultimately has an impact on the human population,” he told me. “So, therefore, this is the secret motivation of this book. I didn’t want to make it a religious book or a political statement — I wanted to inspire people to cook. But since you discovered the hidden message, you have the answer.”

Back to the vegetables. A prime example of Ripert’s approach is the Caesar-salad gratin. You make a simple dressing, grate a lot — I mean a lot — of Parmesan cheese, then brush the dressing on the cut side of halved romaine hearts, sprinkle with the cheese and slip them under the broiler for a few minutes. The result is something that straddles the line between raw and cooked, hot and cold, and I found it nothing short of astonishing, in a why-didn’t-I-think-of-that kind of way but also in a when-am-I-making-this-again kind of way. Ripert said he came up with it with friend and fellow chef Laurent Manrique one day when they craved Caesar salad but wanted something more.


Poached Halibut with Fines Herb Vinaigrette

Recipe by Chef/Owner Eric Ripert, Le Bernardin, New York City

1 quart plus 1/4 cup water, divided
6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 cup dry white Vermouth
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup orange juice
Fine sea salt and freshly ground white pepper
1/4 cup Sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 to 5 tablespoons canola oil
Four 6-ounce halibut fillets
1/4 cup chopped fines herbs (a mixture of chives, parsley, tarragon and chervil)

1. Bring 1 quart water to a boil in a wide shallow pot set over high heat. Whisk the flour into 1/4 cup cold water until smooth and stir into the boiling water. Add the Vermouth, lemon juice and orange juice and boil the poaching liquid until it thickens. Season with a generous pinch of salt and reduce the temperature to low heat so that the poaching liquid is hot but not boiling, about 180°F.

2. Combine the Sherry vinegar and Dijon mustard in a mixing bowl and season to taste with salt and pepper. Slowly whisk in the extra-virgin olive oil to emulsify the vinaigrette and just enough canola oil to balance out the acidity.

3. Generously season the halibut fillets with salt and white pepper and place them in the poaching liquid. Poach the fish until it feels just barely warm in the center when a metal skewer is inserted into the fish and left in for 5 seconds.

4. While the halibut is cooking, stir the fines herbs into the vinaigrette.

5. When the fish is cooked, remove the fillets from the poaching liquid with a slotted spatula onto a towel lined plate or tray. Then transfer the halibut fillets to large warm plates, spoon the vinaigrette over and around the fish and serve immediately.


Dining Tip: Eric Ripert's Sautéed Cod with Pea Shoots

For the ginger-lemon-scallion broth:
• 1 tablespoon canola oil
• 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
• 1 shallot, thinly sliced
• 8 to 12 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and discarded, thinly sliced
• 1 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
• 3/4 cup chicken stock
• Fine sea salt and freshly ground white pepper

For the cod:
• 2 tablespoons canola oil
• 4 7-ounce cod fillets
• Fine sea salt and freshly ground white pepper
• 1 cup Wondra flour

For the pea shoots:
• 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
• 1 clove garlic, minced
• 1/2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
• 8 cups baby pea shoots, or the tops of adult pea shoots, loosely packed
• 2 ounces fava beans, shelled, peeled and split in half
• 1 tablespoon soy sauce
• Fine sea salt and freshly ground white pepper

For finishing the dish:
• 2 scallions, green parts only, thinly sliced on a bias
• 1 teaspoon lemon zest, lightly blanched

For the ginger-lemon-scallion broth:

1. Heat the oil in a medium saucepan set over medium-low heat. Add the garlic, shallot, mushrooms and all but a few slices of the ginger, and cook, covered, for 5 minutes, being careful not to let the ingredients brown.

2. Uncover, and add the stock. Bring the stock to a low simmer, and cook for 25 minutes. Season.

3. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve into a container with a lid, and refrigerate until ready to use. (Note: The reserved ginger will be used to finish the dish.)

For the cod:

1. Divide the oil between two ovenproof sauté pans (each will hold two fillets), and heat until the oil is very hot but not smoking. Season the fillets on both sides, and lightly dust with the flour, shaking off any excess. Lay the fillets in the pans, and let the fish cook undisturbed until golden, about 3 to 4 minutes.

2. Carefully turn the fish over, and finish cooking it on the other side, about 2 to 3 minutes more. The fish is done when a metal skewer can be easily inserted into the fish and feels warm when left in for 5 seconds. Remove from heat, and let rest.

For the pea shoots:

1. Melt the butter in a large sauté pan set over medium-low heat. Add the garlic and ginger. Cover, and cook until tender, about 2 minutes.

2. Add the pea shoots. Increase the heat to medium-high, and cook until they shrink to about half their size and give off some moisture (baby pea shoots will wilt readily, while adult pea shoot tops will need to cook a bit longer). Add the fava beans, and toss with the pea shoots to warm them. Add the soy sauce, and toss briefly to coat. Season, and remove from heat.

For finishing the dish:

1. Bring the broth to a boil in a small saucepan. Add the reserved ginger slices, and infuse for 1 minute. Remove the ginger, using a slotted spoon, and add the scallions and zest.

2. Divide the pea shoots into four portions, and arrange each in the center of a shallow serving bowl. Place a fillet on top of each mound of pea shoots. Pour the broth around, and serve. Serves 4.


Eric Ripert

Eric Ripert is grateful for his early exposure to two cuisines--that of Antibes, France, where he was born, and to Andorra, a small country just over the Spanish border where moved as a young child. His family instilled their own passion for food in the young Ripert, and at the age of 15 he left home to attend culinary school in Perpignan. At 17, he moved to Paris and cooked at the legendary La Tour D'Argent before taking a position at the Michelin three-starred Jamin. After fulfilling his military service, Ripert returned to Jamin under Joel Robuchon to serve as chef poissonier.

In 1989, Ripert seized the opportunity to work under Jean-Louis Palladin as sous-chef at Jean Louis at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. Ripert moved to New York in 1991, working briefly as David Bouley's sous-chef before Maguy and Gilbert Le Coze recruited him as chef for Le Bernardin. Ripert has since firmly established himself as one of New York's--and the world's--great chefs.

In 1995, at just 29 years old, Ripert earned a four-star rating from the New York Times. Ten years later and for the fourth consecutive time, Le Bernardin again earned the New York Times' highest rating of four stars, becoming the only restaurant to maintain this superior status for this length of time, without ever dropping a star.

In 1997, GQ named Le Bernardin the best restaurant in America, and in 2007, the magazine named Le Bernardin one of "Seven Food Temples of the World." In 2005, New York magazine declared Le Bernardin the #1 restaurant in the city, awarding it five stars in the inaugural restaurant rating issue -- a position it holds today. Also in 2005, Bon Appetit declared Ripert's Butter-Poached Lobster with Tarragon and Champagne its "Dish of the Year."

Le Bernardin continues to receive universal critical acclaim for its food and service, and currently ranks 18 on the S. Pellegrino World's 50 Best Restaurants list. The Michelin Guide, which made its New York debut in 2005, honored Chef Ripert and Le Bernardin with its highest rating of three stars in 2005 and each year thereafter. In the 2011 edition of the Zagat Guide, Le Bernardin receives a "29 out of 30" rating for food: the highest in New York City and the first time that's happened since 1996. In 1998, the James Beard Foundation named Le Bernardin "Outstanding Restaurant of the Year" and Eric Ripert "Top Chef in New York City." In 1999, the restaurant received the "Outstanding Service” award from the Beard Foundation, and in 2003, the Foundation named Ripert "Outstanding Chef in the United States." In his year-end dining feature, Frank Bruni of The New York Times selected Le Bernardin as the "Best Meal of 2008." In addition, Ripert has partnered with The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company to open restaurants at various destinations including Blue in Grand Cayman, Westend Bistro in Washington D.C., and 10 Arts Bistro in Philadelphia.

Ripert has served as guest judge (and "fan favorite") on Bravo's Top Chef for four seasons and has appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman, The Charlie Rose Show, Ellen DeGeneres, TODAY, Regis & Kelly, and Martha Stewart. In fall 2008, Ripert published "On the Line," his second cookbook with Artisan. In 2002, Artisan published A Return to Cooking, a collaboration between Ripert, photographers Shimon and Tammar Rothstein, artist Valentino Cortazar, and writer Michael Ruhlman that was selected by Newsweek as one of its best books of the season. In September 2009, AVEC ERIC, Ripert's first TV show, debuted on PBS stations, and is currently in its second season. The show won two Daytime Emmy Awards: "Outstanding Culinary Program" (2011) and "Outstanding Achievement in Main Title and Graphic Design" (2010). "Avec Eric: a culinary journey with Eric Ripert," (Wiley) was released in November 2010 with more than 100 recipes inspired by Ripert's travels.

Ripert is the Chair of City Harvest's Food Council, working to bring together New York's top chefs and restaurateurs to raise funds and increase the quality and quantity of food donations to New York's neediest. When not in the kitchen, Ripert enjoys good tequila and peace and quiet. He lives on the Upper East Side and Sag Harbor with his wife and young son.


Eric Ripert's Coconut Cookies

When star chef Eric Ripert needs a getaway, he heads to the Caribbean. Turquoise waters, white sand beaches – who could complain?

But when a puddle jump to the islands isn’t possible, Ripert evokes the tropics with this special coconut cookie recipe.

“These cookies remind me of my long love affair with the island of Puerto Rico, where I’ve visited at least once a year for the past 30 years,” he says.

It’s a momentary break from the frenzy of the holidays, and, as a bonus, it tastes great. “I love the sweetness of this cookie. It has a good texture and really carries the subtle flavor and scent of the coconut.”

This recipe makes enough for four generous gifts or eight smaller packages. The rich, buttery flavor of the thin cookies makes it impossible to eat just one.

Coconut Cookies

Makes 8 dozen cookies
• 1½ cups softened butter
• 2 cups light brown sugar
• 1 cup sugar
• 3 large eggs
• 1 tsp. vanilla extract
• 2 cups shredded coconut
• 2½ cups all-purpose flour
• 2 tsp. baking soda
• 1 tsp. salt
• Powdered sugar, for dusting

1. Beat butter, light brown sugar and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer at medium speed, 1 to 2 minutes, until creamy.
2. Add eggs, one at a time, followed by vanilla extract and coconut, mixing until blended.
3. Whisk together flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl. Add flour mixture to coconut mixture, beating at low speed just until blended.
4. Cover and chill dough at least for 1 hour.
5. Drop dough by teaspoonfuls two inches apart onto ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 325ய, 12 to 14 minutes or until cookies are golden brown.
6. Remove from oven and let stand 1 minute before transferring to wire racks to cool completely.
7. Dust with powdered sugar.



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