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10 Ways to Eat Healthy When Eating Out Slideshow

10 Ways to Eat Healthy When Eating Out Slideshow



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Eating Healthy When Eating Japanese

Tseng explains, “Japanese cuisine is generally lighter and lower in fat content. However, consumers must keep in mind that it may be higher in sodium. Like many Asian cuisines, Japanese cuisine uses soy sauce in addition to salt to flavor the food.” Tseng suggests using half of your normal intake of soy sauce if low-sodium soy sauce isn’t available. Look for high-nutrient menu items such as edamame, miso soup, or soba (buckwheat) noodles.

Eating Healthy When Eating Indian

“Spices commonly used in Indian cuisine are known to be high in antioxidants. However, they use quite a bit of salt to enhance the flavors. Some regions of Indian cuisines also use full-fat yogurt,” says Tseng. She suggests choosing non-creamy curries when eating out in an Indian restaurant. Nutritionist Sheela Prakash gives further advice: “Though most people think saag paneer is healthy because it’s spinach, it’s actually super unhealthy because it’s made with cream. Choose tandoori chicken over chicken tikka. Both are spiced with the same red spice mix, but tikka comes in a red cream sauce while tandoori is more of a dry rub.”

Eating Healthy When Eating French

Though the “French paradox” seems to hold true — eating butter, cheese, and foie gras to their hearts’ content while remaining svelte — this doesn’t mean that French food sets the bar for healthy eating when dining out. Tseng reminds us that French cuisine is “known to have small delicate portions. The average American is not used to the small portion they see in French restaurants, and therefore tend to overeat by ordering more dishes."

"Stick with the small portions the restaurant provides,” Tseng advises. Additionally, stick to foods from the Southern region of France. Dishes like ratatouille or salade Niçoise are full of vegetables and healthy proteins, and use olive oil instead of butter as cooking fat.

Eating Healthy When Eating Southern/Soul Food

Fried chicken, biscuits and gravy, pulled pork — soul food triggers images of dishes high in fat, sugar, and sodium. However, there are plenty of nutrient-rich options as well, though it might mean sticking to the sides. Consider making a meal out of dishes such as collard greens, red beans and rice, black-eyed peas, okra, or sautéed sweet potatoes, which are full of antioxidants and filling enough that you won’t miss the meat.

Eating Healthy When Eating Chinese

istock/karenhermann

Chinese cuisine may contain hidden sodium and fat, and some dishes may be fried before being cooked in a sauce. Tseng suggests, “Stick with steamed dishes if possible. Stay away from thick, heavy sauces (particularly brownish sauces) to reduce sodium intake. Ask for brown rice instead of white rice to increase fiber in the meal, and cut rice portions in half. Chinese cuisine has a good variety of different vegetables in addition to broccoli and bok choy if you are daring enough to try them!”

Eating Healthy When Eating Italian

Pasta has a surprisingly low fat content, but it’s important to stick with red, clam, or meatless marinara sauces in order to steer clear from saturated fat. Though not always easy to find, depending on which Italian restaurant you choose, farrois a traditional Italian grain that’s a healthy alternative to rich pasta dishes. Farro is a whole grain rich in fiber and vitamins, and it makes a delicious risotto.

Eating Healthy When Eating American

A lot of eating out in American restaurants is about planning — choosing to fill up on lighter foods like salad or soup first, or sharing large portions with friends. Prakash notes other tips, like choosing different types of meat for burgers. "Bison is actually super lean and good for burgers. Turkey or chicken burgers are also good options. Replace fries with a baked sweet potato or sweet potato fries.”

Eating Healthy When Eating Greek

Even though spanakopita (spinach pie), dolmades (stuffed grape leaves,) or Greek salad seem healthy, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), some Greek dishes can contain as many calories as a Big Mac. The CSPI recommends choosing kebabs (roasted lean cuts of lamb or pork), getting your dolmades stuffed with rice only, and asking for feta and dressing on the side of your salad.

Eating Healthy When Eating Seafood

Seafood is full of omega-3s and is said to reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer, and stroke. But eating out in a seafood restaurant still presents its challenges — certain species of fish contain high levels of mercury and PCBs, and not every fish comes from a healthy source. The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch recommends albacore tuna, Alaskan salmon, and shellfish such as oysters and mussels as the best choices for human health.


10 New Ways to Eat Oatmeal

In a rush to get out the door in the morning? This no-cook healthy breakfast comes together in a flash, thanks to some easy prep work the night before.

Ingredients:
Makes 1 serving
1/2 c. old fashioned oatmeal
1/2 c. almond milk (regular milk will also work)
1 heaping spoonful dark chocolate cocoa powder
1 tbsp. chia seeds
1 packet or 1 tsp. sweetener (such as Stevia, Splenda or sugar), optional
½ frozen banana, sliced

Directions:
Combine oatmeal and sweetener in a container, cover, and refrigerate overnight. In the morning, stir up oatmeal mixture. Top with frozen banana slices, stir, and enjoy! Note: You may stir in more milk in the morning until your desired consistency is achieved.


1. Look for Quality Ingredients

According to a 2014 fast-food survey by Consumer Reports, Americans are spending more than ever to dine out -- topping $680 billion per year. And they are demanding higher-quality fast food and greater variety than just a burger and fries. In fact, the survey showed that quality tops convenience when Americans make dining decisions. That's a change from 2011, the last year the survey was conducted. "Many restaurants have been adding items with healthier ingredients like kale, quinoa and oats," says Toby Amidor, M.S., RD, national nutrition expert and author of "The Greek Yogurt Kitchen: More Than 130 Delicious, Healthy Recipes for Every Meal of the Day." For example, Starbuck's Hearty Veggie and Brown Rice Salad Bowl contains roasted butternut squash, beets, kale, red cabbage, steamed broccoli florets and garden peas with a lemon-tahini dressing. "And you can find dishes made with whole grains, like McDonald's oatmeal," adds Amidor.

According to a 2014 fast-food survey by Consumer Reports, Americans are spending more than ever to dine out -- topping $680 billion per year. And they are demanding higher-quality fast food and greater variety than just a burger and fries. In fact, the survey showed that quality tops convenience when Americans make dining decisions. That's a change from 2011, the last year the survey was conducted. "Many restaurants have been adding items with healthier ingredients like kale, quinoa and oats," says Toby Amidor, M.S., RD, national nutrition expert and author of "The Greek Yogurt Kitchen: More Than 130 Delicious, Healthy Recipes for Every Meal of the Day." For example, Starbuck's Hearty Veggie and Brown Rice Salad Bowl contains roasted butternut squash, beets, kale, red cabbage, steamed broccoli florets and garden peas with a lemon-tahini dressing. "And you can find dishes made with whole grains, like McDonald's oatmeal," adds Amidor.


How to Eat Healthy without “Dieting”

Eating healthy can be easy, affordable and delicious. It&rsquos all about making smart choices to build an overall healthy dietary pattern.

After all, a healthy diet can help reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke and lots of other things you&rsquod rather avoid. The good news is, eating right doesn&rsquot have to be hard or require you to give up all of the foods you love.

Here are some tips to help you and your family adopt a healthier eating style:

INCLUDE

LIMIT

  • Sweetened drinks and dietary cholesterol
  • Fatty or processed red meats &ndash if you choose to eat meat, select leaner cuts
  • Refined carbohydrates like added sugars and processed grain foods
  • Full-fat dairy products
  • Tropical oils such as coconut and palm oil

AVOID

We can help you make healthier choices:

  • Choose mindfully, even with healthier foods. Ingredients and nutrient content can vary a lot.
  • Read labels. Compare nutrition information on package labels and select products with the lowest amounts of sodium, added sugars, saturated fat and trans fat, and no partially hydrogenated oils.
  • Watch your calories. To maintain a healthy weight, eat only as many calories as you use up through physical activity. If you want to lose weight, take in fewer calories or burn more calories.
  • Eat reasonable portions. Often this is less than you are served, especially when eating out.
  • Cook and eat at home. You&rsquoll have more control over ingredients and preparation methods.
  • Look for the Heart-Check mark to easily identify foods that can be part of an overall healthy eating pattern.

More Tips

    - Healthy home cooking and smart shopping puts you in control of what goes into your recipes and your body. Follow these healthy guidelines to update your eating style and improve your nutrition profile. - Try these daily tips that will help your family take a step-by-step approach to eating healthy. - Learn how to keep track of what you eat in order to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight. - So-called &ldquosuperfoods&rdquo alone won&rsquot make you healthier &ndash but adding these nutritious foods to an already balanced diet can bring health benefits. - Eating healthy on a budget can seem difficult but it can be done! Being creative can help you stick to your budget and incorporate nutritious foods into your diet. Try these tips to incorporate some of these inexpensive foods into your weekly menu. - All too often, kids are rewarded with unhealthy foods and sugary drinks and desserts, but there are lots of healthy choices that taste great! - Chef for NBC's Biggest Loser and author, Devin Alexander shares her personal perspective as a chef in this blog entry with great ideas for healthy snacks for the whole family to bring on their summer vacation or anywhere! - Part of being Healthy for Good&trade is creating simple daily habits you can stick with. One important habit that can help kick-start your day is eating a healthy breakfast. Think outside the (cereal) box with these quick and easy ideas. - The number of meals you eat may not be so important. How you eat those meals is what matters most when it comes to decreasing the risk of heart disease and other health problems that come along with being overweight. - Many shoppers assume organic products are more nutritious and safer to eat, but these perceptions are based more on hype than hard science. - Picky eaters can miss out on a lot of good food! Not only can it be challenging cooking for folks who refuse to eat some foods, but they can also miss out on important nutrients found in foods often on the I-Don&rsquot-Eat list. - Don&rsquot let excuses get in the way of eating healthy! Check out our tips on breaking out of the scarfing cycle. - While you may be familiar with brown rice and 100% whole wheat bread, there are lots of other tasty whole grain options.

Written by American Heart Association editorial staff and reviewed by science and medicine advisers. See our editorial policies and staff.


Copycat Wendy's Chili

Kiersten Hickman/Eat This, Not That!

Thanks to a clear list of ingredients on the Wendy's website, it was easy to put together this recipe. According to the list, the Wendy's chili has a chili base, tomatoes, chili beans, pink beans, kidney beans, onions, celery, green peppers, ground beef, chili pepper, garlic powder, and spices. While the recipe also has sugar and modified corn starch in it, we know that you can have a delicious chili without either of those additives, so we didn't bother adding them into our version.

Get our recipe for Copycat Wendy's Chili.


5. Plan to Cut Loose

"Personally, I set aside Friday and Saturday evening, and then either Sunday breakfast, brunch or lunch, for &aposfun&apos meals," says Samantha Coogan, RD, director of the didactic program in nutrition and dietetics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "During the day on Friday and Saturday, I&aposll stick to my usual regimen, but come dinnertime, anything goes."

Her philosophy for these meals is if she&aposs going to do it, she&aposs going to do it right. "I never shoot for the &aposlighter&apos option or try to make substitutions or ask for any sauces to be on the side," she says. "I&aposm also not going to obsess over every calorie or macronutrient or the amount of sugar in my margarita. I can fully let go and enjoy the moment, atmosphere and experience."

Letting yourself do this every once in a while means you won&apost feel the need to do it every day. "Honestly, by the end of the weekend, even with those few indulgences, I feel ready to get back to my usual, healthier eating habits for the week," she says. "Just like anything, you can also burn out on junk food, so this still allows you to get a taste for it without overdoing it."


The History Of Sliders

Based on a simple Google search, there are definitely differing opinions on how the slider came to be called the slider.

It’s possible that it originated from the Navy and wasn’t even related to the small burgers most think of as sliders. It may actually have just been a term for regular old burgers because they would slide back and forth on the griddle in heavy seas.

Other definitions online, such as the Urban Dictionary, simply say that the term slider is just slang for White Castle burgers (the fast food chain). They say the term refers to the way the burgers slide right through your colon! Ha! White Castle actually trademarked the term “slyder” and used it for 20+ years starting in 1985. From my research, it seems like White Castle did invent the slider in the 1920s, but they say the term comes from how easy they are to eat rather than how they slide through your colon. Here’s what the White Castle website says:

“In 1921, it all started out so innocently. A five-cent small hamburger. A Castle-shaped restaurant. And nothing like it before, or since. A humble 100% beef patty with onions, and a pickle. So easy to eat, it was dubbed the Slider.”

It seems that the most widely accepted purist definition of what a slider actually is goes something like this: A thin slab of beef cooked on a griddle with onions and then topped with the bun before being removed from the griddle such that the steam from the onions cooks the bun as well.

Now we use the term to refer to just about anything on a small bun, even if it doesn’t meet the true “slider” criteria.