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The Ultimate Guide to Pie

The Ultimate Guide to Pie



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"People love pie. Even if it is not as perfect as you want it to be, people will eat it," says Millicent Souris, author of the cookbook How to Build a Better Pie. "Pie is not cute or darling or maternal. It's a flaky crust filled with something sweet or savory then baked. It's as old as the hills — simple and classic." And it's definitely not something to be afraid of. After all, pie is what America had for dessert each night before dessert became the subject of fetishized fads, be it cupcakes, cake pops, or macarons. And that's because it was something that almost anyone could make.

Click here to see The Ultimate Guide to Pie Slideshow

Souris' no-nonsense approach to cooking and baking is just what first-time (and seasoned!) pie bakers need. In the introduction to her book, she points out that so much of food culture today is obsessed with making things bigger, better, and more outrageous, at the expense of teaching people kitchen basics. So with a little advice from her book, we're going to start at the beginning and help you hit the ground running as fast as possible.

Equipment
The usefulness of many of these things will seem self-evident, while others may not seem very useful — that is, until you need them. Just make sure these things are in your kitchen for a smooth and stress-free pie-baking experience.

Pie plate. Check. Wooden rolling pin. Measuring cups and spoons — both liquid measure and dry measure. Aluminum foil, baking sheet, mixing bowls, pastry brush, parchment paper — check.

Baking beans. What? At some point, a recipe is going to call for a hill of beans. Dried beans, to be exact. Any type will do. But why? Well, dried beans are used in a technique called "blind baking," in which the crust is weighed down with beans to help maintain its shape. (No, you don't have to put on a blindfold.)

Bench scraper. Great for cleanup whenever you're working with flour or dough directly on your work surface.

Cast-iron pan. An 8- to 10-inch model will do nicely. Great for pot pies and many other things, a cast-iron pan can be passed down through the generations with proper care. Click here to see 5 Myths About Cast Iron.

Pasta cutter. Great for making dough strips for lattice top pies.


The Ultimate Thanksgiving Pie Guide

Consider this the ultimate resource for all of your Thanksgiving pie needs. I’m sharing my top 20 holiday pie recipes, plus pie baking tips and more!

It turns out that I have a thing for pie. And in the 12 years that I’ve been blogging I’ve created quite the collection of pies and tarts in my recipe archives— over 75!

With Thanksgiving just a few days away I thought I’d highlight a few that would be right at home on your holiday table, plus my favorite pie crust recipes, tips, and resources so you can bake the perfect pie this holiday season.


Recipes For Apoetizets With Pie Crust - Easy Homemade Pie Crust Recipe Step By Step Guide And Video : It's so yummy and perfect with just about any filling.

Recipes For Apoetizets With Pie Crust - Easy Homemade Pie Crust Recipe Step By Step Guide And Video : It's so yummy and perfect with just about any filling.. These pie crust recipes don't actually make a classic pie. Pie crusts are made by working fat into flour — when the fat melts during baking, it leaves behind layers of crispy, flaky crust. This pie crust recipe uses just a few simple ingredients and turns out perfect every time. Our favorite butter pie crust recipe that makes consistent flaky pie dough every time. It's a pie crust, which is really only a few ingredients and few easy steps.

But it's presented neatly, easy nobody wants that piece of pie with no pie crust! 39 appetizers for a crowd that are easy and unexpected. When it's time to chill the dough, divide it in pie crust. Jump to the full pie crust recipe. You can always get creative and add hazelnut spread, jam, or even.

Easy All Butter Flaky Pie Crust from i.ytimg.com You can't make another pie from it, it's too little dough … Pie crusts are made by working fat into flour — when the fat melts during baking, it leaves behind layers of crispy, flaky crust. This crust is especially good as a base for eggnog pie with rum, but can be used with almost any custard pie. This pie crust recipe uses just a few simple ingredients and turns out perfect every time. This pie crust is buttery, flaky and is perfect for sweet or savory pies. It's made with just butter, no shortening. This pie crust has a great flaky crust that turns out a little crisp on the outside but soft in the center. This homemade pie crust recipe is tender, buttery and flaky.

All you need are four ingredients to make these simple yet addictive cookies:

If you're looking for the best pie crust recipe, you found the right place. This is her recipe for pie crust. Here's my all time favorite pie crust recipe! This pie crust has a great flaky crust that turns out a little crisp on the outside but soft in the center. All you need is your thumb and index finger—and maybe a little letting the dough proof in the fridge will extend the rising process, resulting in a more tender and flavorful crust. Make these easy pies this weekend! Find healthy, delicious pie crust recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at eatingwell. The recipe calls for a homemade pie crust, but you can easily save time by using a store bought version. These pie crust recipes don't actually make a classic pie. Festive indian appetizers in a glasson dine chez nanou. Just go around the pie pan. Stands the test of time. The ultimate step by step guide to how to make the perfect light and flaky gluten free pie crust in just one bowl.

You can make this in the food processor or. This easy fresh strawberry pie with homemade all butter crust is bursting with fresh strawberries. I use this often as i am a pie baker. It's a pie crust, which is really only a few ingredients and few easy steps. Stands the test of time.

Pie Crust Crackers Savory Mushroom Rosemary Parmesan Crackers from www.taketwotapas.com Start your party off right with these party food ideas and easy appetizer recipes for dips, spreads cook the flatbread until the crust is golden brown, and broil the pizza for one minute for perfectly melted cheese. This pie crust recipe uses just a few simple ingredients and turns out perfect every time. Everyone needs a reliable pie dough recipe in their repertoire, for where would we be without strawberry tarts, spinach quiche, or deep dish apple pie? You can make this in the food processor or. Pies are wonderful desserts because they're easy to make (especially if you use a prepared pie crust!) and loved by all. 39 appetizers for a crowd that are easy and unexpected. With all the flavor of a traditional tomato pie, these tiny tarts will be a hit at your party. Who says pie crust is only for desserts?

When it's time to chill the dough, divide it in pie crust.

When it's time to chill the dough, divide it in pie crust. Pie crust is an extremely versatile pastry. The recipe calls for a homemade pie crust, but you can easily save time by using a store bought version. It's made with just butter, no shortening. This pie crust recipe uses just a few simple ingredients and turns out perfect every time. It's been passed down through generations. This is her recipe for pie crust. You can totally make them in your oven, broiler or even on the stove. All pie crusts contain (by volume) roughly three parts flour, two parts fat (usually shortening or butter), and one part water. Make these easy pies this weekend! It's a pie crust, which is really only a few ingredients and few easy steps. … · this pie crust recipe, rather pie crust method makes consistent dough and makes dough that's a dream to roll out. 39 appetizers for a crowd that are easy and unexpected.

But it's presented neatly, easy nobody wants that piece of pie with no pie crust! Pie crusts are made by working fat into flour — when the fat melts during baking, it leaves behind layers of crispy, flaky crust. Start your party off right with these party food ideas and easy appetizer recipes for dips, spreads cook the flatbread until the crust is golden brown, and broil the pizza for one minute for perfectly melted cheese. Double it if you plan on making a lattice top or decorative edge. Mortadella, cheese, asiago, salami, egg yolks, black olives, mozzarella cheese and 3 more.

Perfect Pie Crust Recipe from www.simplyrecipes.com Here's my all time favorite pie crust recipe! Make these easy pies this weekend! It's a pie crust, which is really only a few ingredients and few easy steps. With a few variations, you can use it for savory and sweet dishes, pies, tarts, and turnovers. Friday night bites | ham and che. This easy fresh strawberry pie with homemade all butter crust is bursting with fresh strawberries. I dove into different pie crust recipes and tinkered around with the best way to make. With all the flavor of a traditional tomato pie, these tiny tarts will be a hit at your party.

You can make this in the food processor or.

This homemade pie crust recipe is tender, buttery and flaky. Pie crust dough doesn't like it. It's a perfect spring treat! Friday night bites | ham and che. Festive indian appetizers in a glasson dine chez nanou. When it's time to chill the dough, divide it in pie crust. This is her recipe for pie crust. You can make this in the food processor or. This crust is especially good as a base for eggnog pie with rum, but can be used with almost any custard pie. I use this often as i am a pie baker. Find healthy, delicious pie crust recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at eatingwell. Pie crust, sugar, cinnamon, and butter. If you're looking for the best pie crust recipe, you found the right place.

Source: www.thereciperebel.com

I use this often as i am a pie baker. Adding alcohol to pie dough aids in crispness and flakiness, which is why you'll sometimes see pie crust recipes that call for vodka. Butter yields the best flavor and the shortening makes it nice and. Mortadella, cheese, asiago, salami, egg yolks, black olives, mozzarella cheese and 3 more. 39 appetizers for a crowd that are easy and unexpected.

Source: elisabethmcknight.com

This pie crust is buttery, flaky and is perfect for sweet or savory pies. I use this often as i am a pie baker. You can always get creative and add hazelnut spread, jam, or even. The recipe calls for a homemade pie crust, but you can easily save time by using a store bought version. There's no magic ingredient in this pie crust recipe, it has the same ingredients as 99% of other recipes out there.

The butter gives your pie crust a delicious buttery flavor and the shortening gives the crust structure and keeps it tender. This homemade pie crust recipe is tender, buttery and flaky. You can't make another pie from it, it's too little dough … Just go around the pie pan. Pie crust dough doesn't like it.

Source: www.pillsbury.com

And there are a million and one perfect pie crust recipes out there. Pies are wonderful desserts because they're easy to make (especially if you use a prepared pie crust!) and loved by all. You can make this in the food processor or. We've collected our best pie recipes that you can make at home. All you need is your thumb and index finger—and maybe a little letting the dough proof in the fridge will extend the rising process, resulting in a more tender and flavorful crust.

You can always get creative and add hazelnut spread, jam, or even. This easy fresh strawberry pie with homemade all butter crust is bursting with fresh strawberries. The perfect pie crust recipe requires only 5 ingredients and yields enough for both bottom and top crust. Stands the test of time. But it's presented neatly, easy nobody wants that piece of pie with no pie crust!

Source: thumbor.thedailymeal.com

You can make this in the food processor or. For this recipe, i use a combination of cold butter and cold vegetable shortening. Who says pie crust is only for desserts? If you're looking for the best pie crust recipe, you found the right place. Just go around the pie pan.

Source: www.shugarysweets.com

We've collected our best pie recipes that you can make at home. I dove into different pie crust recipes and tinkered around with the best way to make. Using a food processor in this recipe eliminates variability. All pie crusts contain (by volume) roughly three parts flour, two parts fat (usually shortening or butter), and one part water. This easy ratatouille recipe is a classic summer french stew filled with vibrant, colourful and nutritious vegetables:

Source: images-gmi-pmc.edge-generalmills.com

Pie crust dough doesn't like it. We've collected our best pie recipes that you can make at home. It's a pie crust, which is really only a few ingredients and few easy steps. This homemade pie crust recipe is tender, buttery and flaky. For this recipe, i use a combination of cold butter and cold vegetable shortening.

Source: bitesizedkitchen.com

And there are a million and one perfect pie crust recipes out there. Recipes using refrigerated pie crust, pillsbury pie crust recipes apple turnovers, savory recipes using pie crust, pillsbury pie crust recipes cinnamon rolls, pie crust. It's made with just butter, no shortening. Pies are wonderful desserts because they're easy to make (especially if you use a prepared pie crust!) and loved by all. Using a food processor in this recipe eliminates variability.

Source: thumbor.thedailymeal.com

This pie crust is buttery, flaky and is perfect for sweet or savory pies.

/> Source: www.thespruceeats.com

I dove into different pie crust recipes and tinkered around with the best way to make.

Source: bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com

The ultimate step by step guide to how to make the perfect light and flaky gluten free pie crust in just one bowl.

Source: www.ambitiouskitchen.com

With all the flavor of a traditional tomato pie, these tiny tarts will be a hit at your party.

Make these easy pies this weekend!

Source: assets.epicurious.com

All pie crusts contain (by volume) roughly three parts flour, two parts fat (usually shortening or butter), and one part water.

But we cannot debate is how much better a pie is with a homemade crust, specifically this one!this perfect.

Source: www.thecomfortofcooking.com

If you're looking for the best pie crust recipe, you found the right place.

Source: thecookingjar.com

Pies are wonderful desserts because they're easy to make (especially if you use a prepared pie crust!) and loved by all.

Source: www.ambitiouskitchen.com

Friday night bites | ham and che.

Source: www.artandthekitchen.com

Find healthy, delicious pie crust recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at eatingwell.

Source: photos.bigoven.com

This pie crust recipe uses just a few simple ingredients and turns out perfect every time.

It's so yummy and perfect with just about any filling.

… · this pie crust recipe, rather pie crust method makes consistent dough and makes dough that's a dream to roll out.

Source: 203123-612111-raikfcquaxqncofqfm.stackpathdns.com

Adding alcohol to pie dough aids in crispness and flakiness, which is why you'll sometimes see pie crust recipes that call for vodka.

Source: cdn.apartmenttherapy.info

Here's my all time favorite pie crust recipe!

Pie crust dough doesn't like it.

Source: alekasgettogether.com

… · this pie crust recipe, rather pie crust method makes consistent dough and makes dough that's a dream to roll out.

Source: images-gmi-pmc.edge-generalmills.com

39 appetizers for a crowd that are easy and unexpected.

Source: imagesvc.meredithcorp.io

This is the one and only pie crust recipe i use.

Source: images.food52.com

For this recipe, i use a combination of cold butter and cold vegetable shortening.

Source: carlsbadcravings.com

But we cannot debate is how much better a pie is with a homemade crust, specifically this one!this perfect.

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

Everyone needs a reliable pie dough recipe in their repertoire, for where would we be without strawberry tarts, spinach quiche, or deep dish apple pie?

Source: thumbor.thedailymeal.com

Start your party off right with these party food ideas and easy appetizer recipes for dips, spreads cook the flatbread until the crust is golden brown, and broil the pizza for one minute for perfectly melted cheese.

Source: www.browneyedbaker.com


The Ultimate Guide to Blind Baking Your Pie Shell

Blind baking – or baking your pie shell before the filling goes into the crust – is one of the most confusing and conflicting issues pie makers face.

I know this because as Dean of The Pie Academy I get a ton of emails on the subject and they’re not, typically, about how well things are working out. Frustration reigns.

Indeed, one Pie Academy member wrote just the other day to say that he’d consulted twenty different websites about how to blind bake his pie shell, only to come up with twenty different methods for accomplishing the same thing.

I’m not surprised. The number might as well have been fifty, because – in fact – there’s more than one way to skin a cat, and more than one way to prebake a crust.

But I’m not about to give you fifty or even twenty suggestions, though I think I’ve tried every trick in the book (and on the web.) I’m simply going to walk you through the method I use for blind baking. With only minor variations, it’s remained virtually unchanged through years of pie making and continues to serve me well today.

The Definition of Blind Baking

A willingness to blind bake your crust, and the skill to do it well, are qualities that separate great pie makers from the merely good ones. It represents a dedication to craft that makes you and your pies the secret envy of the other cooks in your circle. It’s the reason your pumpkin pies, chess pies, and pecan pies always get eaten first. Your pie crusts are fabulous theirs are flabby and forgettable.

By definition, blind baking means prebaking your pie shell – either partially or fully – to “set” the crust and keep it, well, as crusty as possible. A prebaked pie shell yields noticeable definition between the crust and filling. Done properly, you get a full measure of crustiness along with the contrasting softness of the filling. People wonder what it is that makes your pies so darn good this is one of your secrets.

Turkey and asparagus quiche with evidence of a nicely blind baked shell

It’s tempting to skip this step because it takes about 30 to 45 minutes, primarily hands off, to prebake and cool the crust. And there’s all that fiddling with foil and beans many cooks would just as soon avoid. But it’s time well spent if you really care about the outcome.

When Should You Blind Bake Your Pie Shell?

First let’s talk about when you don’t need to blind bake your shell, and that’s pretty much whenever you’re making a traditional fruit pie, one with either a top crust or a crumb topping.

You probably know this already: if you’re making a double crust fruit pie, there’s simply no way to attach a top pastry if the shell is already baked. The edge of the shell would be too dry and crusty to attach a lid.

But what about a crumb topped fruit pie, when there is no top crust? Might there be some value in prebaking the crust before the fruit goes in, so it’s less likely to become saturated by the fruit juices?

We don’t blind bake the shells for double crust fruit pies because there would be no way to attach the lid

The answer is sorta, but mostly no. It’s true that partially prebaking the crust will make it more moisture proof. But it’s also true that the tradeoff will almost certainly be an overbaked crust. By the time you prebake the crust thirty minutes or so, then add the filling and bake your pie for perhaps another hour, long enough for the thickener to thicken, your pie crust will be unappetizingly overdone.

Other than fruit pies, there’s a host of pies that do benefit from partially prebaking the crust. This includes pumpkin and sweet potato pie, custard pie, chess pie, pecan pie, and buttermilk pie, to name just a few. Loose, liquid fillings, in other words, that can easily saturate a pie shell. On the savory side, a quiche almost always calls for a partially prebaked shell.

All of these are typically baked at a lower temperature than fruit pies and for less time, so the risk of overbaking the shell is minimal.

Finally, certain pie shells are fully prebaked, or blind baked, when the pie recipe calls for no further baking. This category includes, primarily, cream pies – like our Eggnog Cream Pie, below – where the filling is cooked separately then added to the shell.

Get Out Your Gear

Here’s what you’ll need to prebake your crust. First, a rimmed baking sheet. Your pie shell will, inevitably, leak a little melted butter as it bakes. Better to keep it off your oven floor unless scouring the oven is your idea of an enjoyable weekend.

Even if you use a baking sheet, the butter may still smoke up your kitchen when it dribbles onto your sheet, which is why I like to first line the baking sheet with parchment. The parchment blots up the butter and greatly reduces the risk of smoking.

Next you’ll need a sheet of aluminum foil about sixteen to eighteen inches long. Use regular weight foil, not heavy duty foil. Because it’s so thick, heavy weight foil doesn’t shape as easily to the sides of the shell. You want the foil to fit like a glove. The pan’s well defined crease and smooth sides should be visible.

Some bakers suggest using parchment paper or even large coffee filters instead of the foil, but neither one of them – even with the weight of the beans – will press against the dough as snugly. Consequently, you’ll often end up with a rounded off bottom crease instead of a well defined one. Your slices won’t look as professional, and that rounded-off area of the crust will be more prone to breaches and leaks. (Note: it’s not unusual for the crease to round off slightly. You’re just trying to minimize it.)

Finally, you’ll need dried beans, a couple of pounds worth of black beans, lima beans, or another large bean. Two pounds is more than enough to bank the beans all the way up the sides of the pan, which is ideal. Some swear by ceramic pie weights but I’ve always been a bean guy. Use your beans over and over again I keep mine in a large Mason jar. Cool them thoroughly before storing.

Line Your Pie Shell With the Foil

When you’re ready to begin baking, adjust one of your oven racks so it’s in the bottom position and the other so it’s in the middle of the oven. If you have only one rack, split the difference so it’s in the position between them. Preheat the oven to 375°.

Many attempts to prebake a pie shell hit the skids before the thing even makes it to the oven. That’s because the dough itself isn’t firm enough to withstand the pushing and shaping that occurs when the foil is nudged against the sides of the shell.

Simple solution: freeze your pie shell for at least 15 to 20 minutes before adding the foil, until it’s firm enough to withstand some jostling.

Center the foil over the shell, then gradually begin nudging it evenly into the pan. Press it clear down to the crease, snugly against the sides, and make sure you can see the crease all around. The foil should fit like a second skin.

Press the foil in snugly. You should be able to see the crease in the pie pan

You’ll be left with several inches of foil overhang on two opposite sides don’t cut it off. Simply fold it down a bit so it’s more or less on a parallel plane with the baking sheet itself. Put the pan on the baking sheet.

Our beans are baked up high on the sides to keep the shell in place

Add enough dried beans to come up almost level with the top of your pie pan, then bank them up the sides until they are level with the top edge of the pan.

Into the Oven it Goes

Put your baking sheet on the bottom rack and set the timer for 25 minutes. Don’t open the oven until the time is up.

After 25 minutes (*see important footnote below) – slide out the rack and carefully – so you don’t accidentally touch the hot pan or baking sheet – grab the overhanging foil on opposite sides and lift out the beans. The foil shouldn’t be hot once you slide out the rack, but touch the foil gingerly, at first, just to be sure. And be aware that you may get steam rising up off the shell when you lift the foil. You can always use oven mitts if you feel more comfortable doing so.

Lift the foil slowly, so it doesn’t grab the shell and pull it up. (Someone recently emailed to say this exact thing had happened to her she nearly pulled the entire shell clear out of the pie pan.) Put the foil and beans aside.

Lifting the foil and beans out of the shell

(If you’d rather do this previous step on top of the stove, rather than bent over the oven, transfer the whole sheet to the stovetop and work from there.)

If your recipe did not say anything about poking holes in the bottom of your shell, do it now, 6 or 8 times. These holes help keep the bottom of the pastry from blowing up like a balloon once the beans are removed. Even if you made holes before you might want to re-poke them they tend to plug up during the initial baking. Transfer the baking sheet to the middle shelf and set the timer for 10 minutes. Again, no peeking except through the oven window.

After 10 minutes, open the door and check your shell. By now, the bottom of the shell should have a dry surface and the top edge of your shell should just be starting to turn golden. If not, slide it back in and bake for another 3 to 4 minutes.

If you need a fully prebaked pie shell, bake an additional 15 to 18 minutes rather than ten, until golden brown and crusty all over.

A partially prebaked shell will be light golden along the top edge, like this

Either way, transfer your pie shell to a cooling rack and cool thoroughly before filling.

I’m probably a little more careful about this than I need to be, but I always take a minute to plug the holes I made in the bottom crust. Even though the holes are small, I put a dab of cream cheese on my index finger and smear the tiniest amount over the holes to plug them. This insures that all the filling stays in the shell, where it should be, and doesn’t drip through the shell and stick to the pan.

If you’re going to make a homemade pie, you want a crust that’s every bit as delicious as the filling. Taking a few extra minutes to prebake the shell, when required, is one of the best ways you can make this happen.

(*Footnote – One astute Pie Academy member emailed to say that some of the temperatures and times mentioned above don’t jive with those in my book PIE. I should have pointed this out earlier, so let me clarify here. I now prefer an initial temperature of 375° instead of 400°. The lower temperature helps reduce the chance of over-browning the edge. I’ve also increased the time of this initial phase of baking by 10 minutes, up to 25 minutes. Many bakers complain that their pie shells tend to shrink up after the beans come out, and the longer initial bake helps minimize the shrinking. I would be interested to hear how it works out for you following these new recommendations.)


The Ultimate Pie Guide From Marie Saba

Nothing says Thanksgiving quite like homemade pie … And as it turns out, baking an impressive one from scratch is easier to pull off than you might think! We’ve had our eye on Marie Saba not only because she is a Women of Today reader but because she also happens to be a pie maker extraordinaire! You may recognize her work from Instagram … Marie is known for her amazing pie crush designs. Have a look ….

Today, she is sharing her tips on how to make the pie crust from scratch. Plus, sharing her delicious apple and pecan pie recipes. If there was ever a time to start baking pies yourself, it’s definitely this Thanksgiving!

First, watch Saba’s videos below for easy tips on how to make pie crust using a food processor.

Pro tip: Don’t over mix the dough and use cold butter and ice water.

Saba assures, “People always freak out if you start talking about pie crust. But there’s nothing to freak out about. Really, even if you horribly over-mix the dough and have virtually no visible pieces of butter, your crust will still taste way better than one of those chemical-filled concoctions from the grocery store.”

Now we’re ready for these incredibly tasty pie recipes … starting with this Updated Apple Pie!


Pie recipes

Perfect pastry and delicious fillings, both sweet and savoury. Cut a slice and dig in.

Chicken, kale & mushroom pot pie

A satisfying chicken and mushroom one-pot that makes a great family supper or freeze leftovers for another day.

Chicken & mushroom puff pie

This is just what you need on a cold night. Serve with creamy mashed potatoes

Indian potato pie

This impressive vegetarian pie is really versatile - it tastes great hot, warm or cold, so you can make it well ahead

Chicken, leek & mushroom pies

Make these creamy chicken, leek and mushroom pies from scratch or use up leftover roast chicken and make a stock from the bones. They require a little extra effort, but they're worth it

Veggie shepherd’s pie with sweet potato mash

The secret to this shepherd's pie filling is to choose big carrots so they don’t lose their texture when cooked


How to make Homemade Pie Crust

Homemade pie crust is simple to make. It’s important not to overwork the ingredients and keep the pie dough cold. I recommend NOT using a food processor when making pie crust.

Using a simple pastry cutter or two forks, cut in the lard and butter by hand. Work the lard and butter into the flour until you have pea-sized pieces.

The less you work the dough, the more likely you are to end up with a blue-ribbon winning pie crust.

Step 1: Use a large mixing bowl to add your flour, salt and combine with a large spoon.

Step 2: Cut in the lard and cold butter. Keep your butter cold while you work.

Step 3: Place ice cubes into a large glass measuring cup and fill with cold water. Slowly add ice water to the flour mixture, until you can gently squeeze the mixture together with your hands.

Step 4: As the pie dough comes together, place it in a large zip-style bag. Refrigerate the prepared pie dough for a minimum of two hours and up to 24 hours.

I worked on my pie crust recipe for a few years just to get it right. It’s about the correct ratio of flour to fat. This pie crust recipe has the perfect buttery, flaky taste with the addition of lard.

Lard, rendered from pig fat, has a higher melting point than butter or shortening thus yielding an extra-flaky crust. Combining butter and lard will help achieve the perfect old-fashioned style pie crust from grandma’s kitchen.

All-purpose or pastry flour are the best for making pie crust. Choosing a lower-gluten flour is the first trick for getting your pie crust right. Bread flour has a high gluten content, while cake flour has the lowest content.

My mom always covered the pie part way through the baking process with a piece of aluminum foil with a little slit cut out of the center in order to vent the steam. So, I do the same with all of my pies. This helps the pie continue to bake without burning the crust. We were raised to use what we had, no fancy gadgets needed.

How to make a lattice pie crust

Step 1: Roll out a piece of pie dough. Then cut into strips either using a small pizza cutter or pastry cutter. Here I used a simple cutter, occasionally I’ll use a pasta cutter that will give you a crimped edge. That’s pretty too when you’re looking to make your pie a little more fancy.

Step 2: Lay strips of pie dough going the same direction over the entire pie. Then fold back every other piece of dough and weave in another strip of pie dough going the opposite direction. Continue this process until you have completed the entire pie.

Step 3: Fold under the edges and crimp. Then brush with egg wash and bake in a preheated 400 degree F oven for about 1 hour or so.

Step 4: Place the unbaked pie on a half sheet pan lined with parchment paper. This will help catch any juices that overflow from the pie, keeping the mess easy to clean up.

(I love these pre-cut sheets of parchment paper. They are so much easier to work with than the rolls of parchment you buy in the grocery store!)


Savoury pie recipes

Delight in sensational savoury pies with crispy pastry and all kinds of fillings, including classic chicken and leek, gooey cheese and even a Christmas pie.

Roast chicken pie

The ultimate comfort food recipe. Golden brown pastry and a creamy chicken, leek and bacon filling make this a real feast for friends and family

Chicken, kale & mushroom pot pie

A satisfying chicken and mushroom one-pot that makes a great family supper or freeze leftovers for another day.

Slow cooker shepherd’s pie

Slow-cook shepherd's pie and you'll be rewarded with succulent mince. This recipe is also low-fat and low-calorie with three of your five-a-day

One-pot paneer curry pie

What's more comforting than a curry in pie form? This one-pot paneer pie is filled with a makhani-style filling and topped with a crisp puff pastry lid

Sweet potato-topped cottage pie

Pre-prepare the mince base and freeze it to make this delicious cottage pie later in the week. It's a wonderfully comforting and nutritious family meal

Sausage & leek mash pie

Enjoy sausages and kale with a cheesy mash topping made with leeks and mustard. You can freeze this pie for busy weeknights when you need to feed a crowd

Chicken, leek & mushroom pies

Make these creamy chicken, leek and mushroom pies from scratch or use up leftover roast chicken and make a stock from the bones. They require a little extra effort, but they're worth it

Pickled onion pork pies

Put a new twist on the pork pie with polenta for texture and a pickled onion in the centre. It is packed with flavour and perfect for a summer picnic

Melty cheese & potato pie

Drawing from the apres-ski classic tartiflette, this indulgent pie transforms into a cheesy fondue with creamy sliced potatoes and crisp puff pastry


The Perfect Pie

Bake beautiful, foolproof versions of the corner bakery classics and French patisserie favorites&mdashplus a host of whimsical, modern pies and tarts of all kinds with sky-high meringue pies, uniquely flavored fruit pies with intricate lattice-woven tops, and lush elegant tarts. And because every recipe has been tested dozens of times, you can be sure they&rsquoll work for you the first time and every time.

An opening chapter covers must-know pies such as Deep-Dish Apple Pie and Chocolate Cream Pie and pairs a photograph with every step so you can become confident in your skills as you bake. As the chapters proceed, you&rsquoll learn new techniques and shortcuts, working with easy-to-roll out doughs (including gluten-free, vegan, and whole-grain dough) and a world of flavorful fillings. Foolproof recipes, loads of beautiful photos, and smart test kitchen know-how guarantee your success.

Some of the recipes you&rsquoll find inside:

Classics with a Twist

Sour Cherry Hazelnut Pie or Pumpkin Prailine Pie

Cookies and Cream Ice Cream Pie (with sugar cone crust)

Elegant and Easy

Strawberry Galette with Candied Basil and Balsamic

Easy Berry Tart (uses store-bought puff pastry!)

Modern Flavors
Crowd Pleasers

Nectarine and Raspberry Slab Galette

Editorial Reviews

"With their bounty of photos and information, ATK cookbooks are great for meeting readers right where they are, and while all home chefs can find a pie recipe here tailored to the skills they already have, they're bound to pick up more along the way."
-Booklist

"The editors of America&rsquos Test Kitchen turn their eye to sweet pies and tarts in this satisfying outing. Recipes range from tried-and-true deep-dish apple pie to a fanciful crème brûlée option whose filling is infused with lavender and torched for crackle. . . . . Fear of pastry is real for many home cooks, and this book is poised to help readers vanquish it."
- Publishers Weekly

"With obsessively tested classic and creative recipes, America&rsquos Test Kitchen offers everything you&rsquoll ever need to know about making pie."
-Library Journal

"When perfection is the goal, this cookbook makes it easy as pie. 'The Perfect Pie' provides loads of inspiration."
-Portland Press Herald

"America&rsquos Test Kitchen cookbooks are a trusted teaching source which offer both thorough instructions and explanations about why the recipes work well. So with Thanksgiving looming, The Perfect Pie: Your Ultimate Guide to Classic and Modern Pies, Tarts, Galettes, and More is the book you need to make sure the desserts on your sideboard are . well, perfect."
-Toledo Blade

"The Perfect Pie: Your Ultimate Guide to Classic and Modern Pies, Tarts, Galettes and More features more than 180-kitchen tested recipes, including Pear-Butterscotch Slab Pie and a dreamy, streusel-topped Pumpkin Praline Pie that will both revive pie memories and inspire new and exciting flavor combinations. . . This book offers step-by-step guides to every critical drape, fold and bend, in addition to tips and tricks to prevent common pie dilemmas, from cracked custards to &ldquoweeping whipped cream."
-San Jose Mercury News

Details

Recipes: 182
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 376
Item Number: CL30
Item Weight: 3.1 pounds


This item must be returned within 6 months of the purchase or ship date.
See return policy for details.


Step by Step Lemon Meringue Pie Recipe

Here is what you will need to serve 6.

(For a printer friendly version, see the recipe card at the end of this post)

For the Pastry

  • 200g (1 + 1/2 Cups) Plain Flour
  • 100g (1/2 Cup) Unsalted Butter, cold & cubed
  • Good Pinch of Salt
  • 1 Egg, beaten
  • 1 tbsp Cold Water

For the Lemon Filling

  • 2-3 Lemons (120ml | 1/2 Cup juice / 2 tbsp zest)
  • 50g (1/3 Cup) Cornflour
  • 225g (1 + 1/8 Cup) Caster Sugar
  • 3 Egg Yolks
  • 360ml (1 + 1/2 Cups) Water

For the Meringue

  • 3 Egg Whites
  • 1/4 tsp Cream of Tartar
  • 75g (1/3 Cup) Golden Caster Sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract

Essential Equipment

  • Large Mixing Bowl
  • Rolling Pin
  • 7&Prime Loose Bottomed Tart Tin
  • Baking Beans or Coins
  • Pastry Brush
  • 2 x Bowls
  • Medium Saucepan
  • Electric Stand Mixer with Whisk Attachment (or Large Bowl with Electric Hand Whisk)

To make the pastry

Weigh out the flour (200g | 1 + 1/2 Cups), butter (100g | 1/2 Cup) and salt (good pinch) into a large mixing bowl and rub the mixture together between your forefingers and thumbs. Keep going until it resembles fine crumbs.

Beat the egg (x 1) into a small glass or bowl then add approximately 3/4 of it to the pastry. (Save the rest, we&rsquore going to need it for brushing later.)

Now give it a good mix to bring it all together. If your dough is still a little crumbly, add tablespoons of cold water (one at a time! Remember, you can always add more but you can&rsquot take it out.) until it holds together.

Then bring it together into a ball, flatten into a disc and wrap in cling film. This next bit is important &ndash place it in the fridge and allow it to rest for 30 minutes. (This will help to stop it from shrinking when we put it in the oven later.)

Now your shortcrust pastry dough has rested it&rsquos time to roll it out. Between two sheets of cling film, roll it out to approx 2-3mm thick with a rolling pin.

Peel off a layer of cling film then gently lower it, pastry side down/cling film side up, into your tart tin. Gently press it into the sides of the tin ensuring there are no trapped air bubbles underneath.

Next, roll your rolling pin over the top to cut off any excess pastry then peel off the cling film and prick the base all over with a fork. Place it into the fridge to chill while you preheat your oven to 180°C/Fan 170°C.

When the oven is preheated, scrunch up a large sheet of baking paper and place it on top of the pastry. Fill it with baking beans or coins and bake for 15 mins. (This is called blind baking.)

Then take it out the oven and carefully remove the beans and baking paper.

Using a pastry brush, it&rsquos now time to brush it all over with the beaten egg we saved earlier. Make sure you get right into every nook and cranny.

Now pop it back into the oven for another 10-12 mins until it&rsquos a lovely golden brown colour.

Congratulations &ndash you just made an epic shortcrust pastry case! Now leave it to one side to cool completely while you make the filling.

Reduce the temperature of your oven to 170°C/Fan 160°C.

To make the lemon curd filling

In a small bowl, mix together the lemon juice (120ml | 1/2 Cup), lemon zest (2 tbsp) and cornflour until it makes a creamy looking liquid. Leave it to one side.

In another bowl, mix together the caster sugar (225g | 1 + 1/8 Cup), and egg yolks (x 3). It will look lumpy but that&rsquos ok, don&rsquot worry.

Next, add the water (360ml | 1 + 1/2 Cups) to a medium sized saucepan and bring it to the boil.

Now add the lemon and cornflour mixture to the boiling water and stir quite vigorously. It should thicken very quickly. Keep stirring for a minute until it&rsquos nice and smooth then take off the heat and allow to cool for 10 minutes.

Once it&rsquos cooled a little, add 1 tbsp at a time of the curd into the sugar/egg yolks. Be patient here or you could cook the egg yolks!

Mixing well after each addition, continue to add tablespoons until about two thirds of it has been added.

At that point, add the whole mixture back into the pan and mix thoroughly.

Keep mixing until the curd is thick (it won&rsquot take long) then pour it into the pastry base and smooth it out.

Leave it at room temperature while we make the meringue. (Do NOT put it in the fridge.)

To make the meringue topping

Add the egg whites (x 3) and cream of tartar (1/4 tsp) into the bowl of an electric stand mixer with the whisk attachment on. (Alternatively you can use a large mixing bowl and an electric hand whisk.)

Whisk the mixture on high until it becomes very frothy.

With the mixer still going, about 1 tbsp at a time/approx 20 seconds or so apart, slowly add in the sugar (75g | 1/3 Cup) until it&rsquos all used.

It should be getting thicker and shinier now. At which point, add in the vanilla (1/2 tsp).

Now you need to keep a very close eye on it. You want to JUST reach the stiff peaks stage (where you can turn the bowl upside down and the meringue will stay in the bowl) but you don&rsquot want to overwhisk it. If you do, the meringue will seep water and deflate after being baked. This has happened to me and it can be so disappointing!

Remember, you can stop it as many times as you want to check but, once you&rsquove overwhisked it, there&rsquos no going back.

Now your meringue is ready it&rsquos time to spoon it onto the curd. Be as generous as you like here but make sure your meringue goes right to the edge of the pie so it completely covers the lemon curd filling.

Now place it into the oven (which should be at 170°C/Fan 160°C) and bake for about 15-20 minutes until the top is a light golden colour.

It should be looking pretty spectacular right about now!

Now leave it to cool for a minimum of 1 hour before serving. Once cool, you can serve straight away or chill it for 4-6 hours if you like. I prefer the texture of the meringue without being refrigerated though if I&rsquom honest.

And there you have it! A glorious lemon meringue pie that you can fill your face with. Beautiful isn&rsquot it?!

Have you made this recipe?

Will this gloriously delicious lemon meringue pie be making it&rsquos way into your home? I&rsquod love to know if it is! Send me your pics and comments on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram or email me at [email protected]

Like baking to be as simple as possible?

You need the right equipment! Check out my Products That Make Baking Easier!


The Ultimate Pie Crust Guide

The following Kitchen Deconstructed experiment was put together by Tessa Arias, the multi-talented blogger behind Handle the Heat and cookbook author of Cookies and Cream: Hundreds of Ways to Make the Perfect Ice Cream Sandwich. Be sure to check out her blog and Ultimate Brownie Recipe Guide and stay tuned for more Kitchen Deconstructed features from Tessa here on Relish.com.

When sampling holiday pie, it’s easy to tell the difference between homemade pie crust and store-bought. The latter usually lacks the buttery flavor and ultra-flaky texture. Yet, most people are intimidated by the idea of “homemade,” even though pie crust relies on the most basic ingredients and equipment you likely already have on hand. And it is actually fairly easy to make—it just requires some patience.

Share the following pie crust findings in one Pinterest pin

So when making your pies from home (and from scratch!) during the busy holidays, should you use butter or shortening? Make the crust by hand or with a food processor? Should you add a tenderizing ingredient, such as sour cream or vodka? Well, it’s all a matter of personal opinion.

To help you find your ideal crust, I went to work testing out these various ingredients and techniques to find out how they affect the final product. I started with a very basic, all-butter and food processor-based pie crust and made small experimental changes. I used the same ingredients, utensils and bakeware (when applicable) to ensure consistent results.

Instead of baking whole pies, I rolled out each dough into about an eighth-inch thickness and cut out small circles with a cookie cutter. I brushed each circle very lightly with egg wash, then baked in a 350F oven for about 13 minutes, until golden. This allowed me to really compare the shape, texture and taste of each batch. Take a look at the results—I hope they help you discover the tricks to making your version of the perfect pie crust!

Control Recipe

Makes enough for one 9-inch single pie

  • 1 1/4 cups (5.3 ounces) all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 stick (4 ounces) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons ice water

Note: The ingredients need to be very cold. Cold ingredients mean flaky texture. Also, you should avoid overworking the dough and making it tough.

In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the flour, salt, and sugar until combined. Add the butter, and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal, with larger chunks of butter remaining. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of ice water over the mixture and pulse until it just comes together without being wet, sticky, or crumbly. Do not over mix. If the dough doesn’t hold together when pinched between your fingers, add another tablespoon of water and pulse.

Place the dough on a large sheet of plastic wrap. Shape the dough into a disk, wrap well in the plastic, and chill in the fridge until firm, at least 1 hour or up to 3 days. Make ahead and freeze, well wrapped in plastic, for up to 2 months. Defrost in the fridge overnight. The dough is now ready to be rolled out and baked.

I wanted to determine the differences between using butter versus shortening in this experiment, so I substituted all of the butter with 1/2 cup well-chilled and cubed vegetable shortening, proceeding with mixing in the food processor.

This dough was very easy to work with since shortening has a higher melting temperature than butter. However, this also means that unlike the very hard chunks of cold butter that remain in the control dough, shortening is soft enough that it is easily overworked, resulting in a crumbly dough instead of a flaky dough.

All-shortening dough doesn’t require as much chilling time and is very soft and malleable. As you can see in the photograph, this all-shortening dough ended up being flat, tender and fairly crumbly. The texture was actually reminiscent of shortbread, and it was completely lacking in flavor.

In fact, the flavor reminded me of store-bought dough. Using a ratio of shortening and butter would produce better results, or mixing the shortening dough by hand instead of using the food processor to avoid over mixing.

The kitchen scientists over at Cook’s Illustrated magazine claim that by substituting a portion of the water with vodka in a pie crust recipe, you prohibit gluten development and therefor ensure a tender, flaky crust. I wanted to see if they were right, so from the control recipe I added 2 tablespoons of cold vodka and reduced the water to 2 tablespoons.

The texture of the dough was surprisingly crumbly but still easy to work with. It baked up flaky but also very tender, though I didn’t find the difference to be revolutionary by any means. I would probably skip the vodka trick altogether next time I make pie crust.

In this trial, I used the same exact ingredients but made the dough by hand, not in the food processor. I used a pastry blender to cut the butter into the flour mixture until it resembled coarse meal, then gently stirred in ice cold water until the dough came together. This method was much more time-consuming and messy than the food processor method. The dough was more difficult to bring together into a cohesive disk, because the chunks of butter were so irregular. However, those irregular chunks of butter produced the flakiest results of all my pie crust experiments. If you don’t have a food processor or if you want the flakiest possible crust, this is definitely the method to use.

Sour cream acts as a tenderizer in baked goods, and I was curious to see if it would significantly affect the texture of pie crust. I added 2 tablespoons of sour cream to the control recipe along with the butter, keeping everything else the same.

The dough itself was very soft and slightly sticky, but easy enough to work with. My circles of sour cream pie crust puffed up to a surprising height. The texture was ultra light, puffy and flaky, almost like puff pastry. The flavor was also fantastic. Beyond the classic control and by-hand recipes, this was my favorite pie crust.

Adding an egg to pie crust is something I first saw from The Pioneer Woman, though many recipes for tart dough call for an egg. I wanted to know how the extra fat and liquid would affect the pie crust, so I added a whole beaten egg along with the water to the control recipe, keeping everything else the same.

The dough came together in a more cohesive ball, which was not surprising since egg acts as a binding agent. The baked crust was rich and firm but tender. The flaky layers seemed heavier than the by-hand crust, and overall, this bordered on being slightly greasy.

Feeling inspired to bake pie? Learn how to fashion your crust into a beautiful lattice or crimp and try one of our favorite pie recipes below.


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