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12 Foods and Beverages Banned Around the World for Reasons Both Sane and Silly Slideshow

12 Foods and Beverages Banned Around the World for Reasons Both Sane and Silly Slideshow


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But should you still eat them?

Absinthe

A high-proofed, licorice-flavored spirit, absinthe has long been the subject of folklore (and horrifying drinking stories) for its hallucinogenic properties, and it was banned in many countries for much of the twentieth century. In 2007, the United States removed its long-standing ban on the sale and production of absinthe, but has since required that the beverage be flavored not with its original defining ingredient, wormwood, or Artemisia absinthium (which contains the psychedelic ingredient thujone), but with a related species, Artemisia abrotanum.

Beluga Caviar

thinkstock

Possibly the most upper-class-sounding food on the planet, beluga caviar comes from the eggs of the beluga sturgeon, a critically endangered fish that exists only in the Caspian, Black, and Adriatic seas. It is banned through much of the world by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) because most the countries that border the sturgeon's native seas fail to prevent their poaching. Perhaps counterintuitively, Iran, which borders the Caspian, is exempt from the ban, as it follows sustainable conservation practices.

Chewing Gum

Wikimedia Commons

Singapore takes its 2004 ban on chewing gum very seriously. Apparently, vandals had been wreaking havoc on Singapore’s infrastructure with chewing gum by clogging key holes, jamming elevator buttons, and deactivating subway door sensors. The ban has since been revised to permit the sale of fortified chewing gum by a doctor or dentist.

Foie Gras

Wikimedia Commons

To make foie gras, duck or geese are force-fed corn through a feeding tube (the process is known as gavage). Over-feeding the poultry causes their livers to grow up to 10 times the normal size, and although foie gras is considered a delicacy is most regions of the world, its questionable production methods have angered animal right’s activists. India has banned the importation of foie gras, while its production is illegal in more than 20 countries including Germany, Israel, and Switzerland. Foie gras was also banned for a time in both Chicago and California, but both bans were later rescinded.

Haggis

Haggis is the second-most famous Scottish product (behind whisky, of course). It’s made of sheep heart, liver, and lungs, mixed with oatmeal, suet, and spices and stuffed — at least traditionally — into a sheep's stomach. It sounds awful but is actually delicious, especially with a dram of Scotch on the side. It’s banned in the U.S. because of a rather arbitrary ban on the lungs of the sheep (though not the heart or liver). The U.K. government is trying to get its American counterpart to overturn the ban; meanwhile, lungless versions are sold here, in cans or wrapped in plastic.

Jelly Cups

Jelly cups are illegal throughout Europe because they contain either konjac, konjac gum, or konjac glucomannan. These additives give the jelly cups, which are designed to be consumed whole in one gulp, their slick and slimy texture, but they have been deemed a choking hazard by the European Union. They are still very popular in Japan, Taiwan, and other Asian countries.

Ketchup

In what is probably the silliest ban on this list, the French banned ketchup from their primary schools because they were afraid students will use it to mask their traditional French cuisine. The idea is that public schools are not only supposed to be feeding children, but teaching them about French cuisine, and ketchup would obviously ruin all those quenelles de brochet and that tripe à la môde de Caen. Ironically, students are still allowed to use ketchup on their French fries.

Kinder Surprise Eggs

It’s no surprise that the combination of toys and chocolate would be a big hit with children, but Kinder Surprise Eggs (hollow, chocolate eggs concealing a plastic toy) are banned in the United States. Although legal in the rest of the world, the 1938 Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act prohibits the selling of food that contains a “non-nutritive object” with the fear that children may choke on them.

Mountain Dew

Mountain Dew is banned in Europe and Japan because it contains brominated vegetable oil (BOV), a food additive that is used to maintain the drink’s unnatural citrus flavor. The chemical has been linked to causing skin and nerve damage, but its use is still permitted in small amounts in the United States, even though it hasn’t been on the FDA's GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list for decades.

Raw Almonds

Though perceived as a healthy snack, 100 percent raw almonds are actually illegal to sell in the U.S. The law was passed following a 2001 salmonella outbreak in Canada, which was later linked back to an almond grower in California. Almonds have to be steam-heated to 200 degrees Fahrenheit or fumigated with propylene oxide gas in order to be sellable. A loophole exists: if producers can show that their regular blanching or roasting methods raise temperatures to the required levels, they can forgo the other processes.

Samosas

Samosas are not a food you can mess up: Fried pastries filled with meat, potato, or lentils? Yes, please. But Al Shabaab, the extremist Muslim group that controls much of war-torn Somalia, has banned locals under their jurisdiction from eating the pastry because unscrupulous vendors were selling samosas filled with rotten meat. Early reports claimed the pastries were banned because their triangular shape was too much like the Christian Trinity, but all you have to do is make it into a more Islamic crescent shape and — voilà! — you’ve got an empanada.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Scenes from a pandemic: Firsthand stories of life in 23 countries, from the TED Fellows

The current coronavirus pandemic is a truly global one in fact, Antarctica is the only continent with no cases (although that could change). Most nations have responded with similar measures — stay-at-home advisories, shutdown of non-essential businesses, social distancing — but the scope of these changes has varied and so has the human impact.

To get a panoramic perspective, TED turned to the TED Fellows. This international group of innovators, researchers, artists and thinkers numbers nearly 500 people in 99 countries. The responses were collected from March 30 through April 7, 2020.

AFGHANISTAN

How would you sum up the situation in your country?

Calamitous. The coronavirus pandemic could have not hit the politically unstable and war-ravaged Afghanistan at a worse time.

How has the pandemic changed your community?

Most expats have been either evacuated or left the country before all the international flights stopped. So my community has literally vanished and the already limited social scene has turned into a non-existing one.

How has it changed your daily life?

The biggest change has been the sudden loss and void of having friends, colleagues and a social circle. Professionally, as a freelancer, I already spend a lot of time working from home, that hasn’t changed however, the logistics of covering the conflict and the pandemic at the same time has just gotten more complicated and taxing. On top of that, the world has become consumed by their own problems, so Afghanistan — despite being at such a historical and crucial period — has lost its place in media and is on its way of being forgotten.

BANGLADESH

The Banani neighborhood of Dhaka

How has the pandemic changed your community?

My neighborhood is unusually empty and silent. Dhaka is the densest city on earth with 18 million inhabitants in a 300-square-kilometer area, so it is extremely rare to find it silent for this long. However, the shutdown has put more people in danger of hunger than danger from the virus itself.

All the communities that live off the street — the rickshaw drivers, street food vendors, hawkers and daily laborers — are in trouble. And we’ve seen a massive number of people coming back to Dhaka from other parts, walking for miles in the scorching sun, without food or water, just to find out their garment factories have extended the closure and there’s no certainty of when they’ll get paid next. Then, just as they’ve arrived in large numbers, they’re now stuck, stranded and hungry, since the city is under stricter lockdown. Who will feed them?

How has it changed your daily life?

I’ve been working from home for almost three weeks now. My department is largely cloud-based, so I did not have many hiccups. Instead of walking to work, now I’m walking from my bedroom to the living room to work. I am lucky to be living next to a park, full of sunlight, trees and birds.

I am completely alone, as two of my housemates are stuck in different places. Oddly, I am walking more at home every day than I did on regular weekdays! I am walking around the house whenever I’m on the phone or reading. I logged 11,000 steps one day — without going out at all. I am also happy to be able to read more than usual.

What strategies or routines are helping you stay grounded?

I am trying to maintain the same routine I had before. I wake up, water the plants, eat breakfast, change my clothes, and sit down to work in a separate room — almost at the same time I’d start working in the office. But I am trying to add diversity to the times when I am not working. I’m walking or running around the house, watching Netflix or reading, but I am trying to do different things every day. I am also calling my friends more often and organizing group video calls.

What message would you like to share with the world at this time?

Only the top 5 percent are comfortably in confinement at home the rest of the world is counting the days until the next full meals for their children. As we’re planning for economic support and bailouts for the post-pandemic economy now, we need to focus on the other 95 percent instead.


Watch the video: The Top 10 Foods That Were Banned In The And Around The World. You Didnt Know


Comments:

  1. Gawain

    liked)))))))))

  2. Dylen

    Correct thought

  3. Bhaic

    I join. It was and with me. We can communicate on this theme. Here or in PM.

  4. Elhanan

    the timely answer



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