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Blueberries Might Be Able to Prevent Gum Disease, Study Says

Blueberries Might Be Able to Prevent Gum Disease, Study Says



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This study found that blueberries contain polyphenols and antibacterial properties

Wild blueberry extract was found to contain antibacterial properties that reduce gum inflammation.

Blueberries not only make a healthy and tasty snack, they might actually help treat gum disease.

An article published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explained that wild blueberry extracts can help to reduce gum inflammation due to the fruit’s antibacterial properties and polyphenols.

Gum disease occurs when bacteria create biofilm or plaque on teeth, leading to gum inflammation.

Researchers from the Oral Ecology Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, and Institute of Nutritional and Functional Foods took samples from wild lowbush blueberries. They found that the extract was able to form biofilms and prevent dental plaque from forming when tested against a bacterium called F. nucleatum, which leads to periodontal disease.

The researchers also observed that the blueberry extract blocked a molecular pathway that causes inflammation, which is linked to gum disease.

The article authors noted that using blueberry extract could potentially reduce the need for antibiotics when patients undergo gum disease treatments.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.


Red wine may help dental health, study says


It may stain your teeth, but it turns out red wine may also be good for them.

According to a new study, polyphenols, the compounds found in red wine (as well as coffee, tea, cider, blueberries and raspberries) can help fight against tooth decay and gum disease, reports the BBC.

The study, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, was done by researchers at the Institute of Food Science Research in Madrid, Spain.

They looked at the effect of two red wine polyphenols on "bad" mouth bacteria that can result in plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

They found these polyphenols were able to prevent the bacteria from sticking to gum tissue. They were even more effective when combined with Streptococcus dentisani, an oral probiotic.

But don't reach for the wine glass just yet. The research was done on cells that simulated gum tissue - not real gum tissue - and the study's authors acknowledge further research is needed on what actually prevents the bacteria from sticking.

On the bright side, the study could lead to new dental treatments to protect your pearly whites in the future.